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Sam Allerdyce

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#1 AJCTON

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 06:50 PM

After 67 days in charge of England due to allegations against him about corruption in football is about to fall on his sword. The greed in the top end of football never ceases to amaze me. Wonder who they will go for and if it will be good for us in the up and coming qualifiers.


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I have no compunction in saying that if some chap starts throwing grenades or starts using pistols, we shall kill him

#2 TRVMP

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 06:54 PM

He had to go, but frankly the revelations weren't THAT shocking. I thought it'd be worse.
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Now before Gavin goes, I'd like to ask him one more question.


Do you like Abba?


#3 HamCam

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 06:59 PM

Considering his murky past this latest episode should not be a surprise.

Big Sam will survive unlike his fellow dinosaurs.
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#4 AJCTON

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 07:11 PM

If the allegations are true he should never be involved in football again, he should also face whatever force the law can bring on him. Usedto like the guy but this just shows the dirty side of the game.


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I have no compunction in saying that if some chap starts throwing grenades or starts using pistols, we shall kill him

#5 TRVMP

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 10:36 PM

I was thinking about this - see if I was head of some kind of investment group looking for a, shall we say, questionable (but not actually illegal) angle, why on earth would I look at football? Yes, it's a multi-billion business, but compared to the amounts of eyeballs on it it's actually quite small. By way of example, I'm sure I saw in Soccernomics that Manchester United would be something like the 90th biggest company in Finland. Probably a bit higher now. But the point is that commensurate to the number of people scrutinizing it at all levels 24/7, it's peanuts.
 
There's got to be other ways of making a fast buck without the eyes of the world on you at all times. If it was construction or mining or something the Telegraph wouldn't have put together this investigative team. So why do people get involved in dodgy stuff in football? Is it the allure of it - the fact that football fascinates millionaires* as much of the rest of us? Is it that there's no shortage of guys who, while they're very rich and very connected, aren't really the most savvy? (Why is Allardyce, comfortably a millionaire who's extremely good at his job and at the absolute pinnacle of his profession, sitting around with guys without having their company vetted and without having his representatives meet them without him first?) I reckon it must be a bit of both.
 
*Ed de Ball is a great example. He's a captain of industry, like David Hopkin, but still finds time for the working man's game. It's actually quite touching in a way, a show of noblesse oblige.

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Now before Gavin goes, I'd like to ask him one more question.


Do you like Abba?


#6 Deano1874

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 07:45 PM

 

I was thinking about this - see if I was head of some kind of investment group looking for a, shall we say, questionable (but not actually illegal) angle, why on earth would I look at football? Yes, it's a multi-billion business, but compared to the amounts of eyeballs on it it's actually quite small. By way of example, I'm sure I saw in Soccernomics that Manchester United would be something like the 90th biggest company in Finland. Probably a bit higher now. But the point is that commensurate to the number of people scrutinizing it at all levels 24/7, it's peanuts.
 
There's got to be other ways of making a fast buck without the eyes of the world on you at all times. If it was construction or mining or something the Telegraph wouldn't have put together this investigative team. So why do people get involved in dodgy stuff in football? Is it the allure of it - the fact that football fascinates millionaires* as much of the rest of us? Is it that there's no shortage of guys who, while they're very rich and very connected, aren't really the most savvy? (Why is Allardyce, comfortably a millionaire who's extremely good at his job and at the absolute pinnacle of his profession, sitting around with guys without having their company vetted and without having his representatives meet them without him first?) I reckon it must be a bit of both.
 
*Ed de Ball is a great example. He's a captain of industry, like David Hopkin, but still finds time for the working man's game. It's actually quite touching in a way, a show of noblesse oblige.

 

 

I think you partially answered your own question. There can't be many industries, other than football, in which the folk at the positions of influence have such a lopsided money:sense ratio. That makes it an excellent place for people to make a quick, dodgy buck.


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Away in a manger, 

No crib for a bed, 

The little Lord Jesus stood up and he said, 

Brian Wake m'Lord, Brian Wake.


#7 Ed de Ball

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 12:43 PM

I was thinking about this - see if I was head of some kind of investment group looking for a, shall we say, questionable (but not actually illegal) angle, why on earth would I look at football? Yes, it's a multi-billion business, but compared to the amounts of eyeballs on it it's actually quite small. By way of example, I'm sure I saw in Soccernomics that Manchester United would be something like the 90th biggest company in Finland. Probably a bit higher now. But the point is that commensurate to the number of people scrutinizing it at all levels 24/7, it's peanuts.
 
There's got to be other ways of making a fast buck without the eyes of the world on you at all times. If it was construction or mining or something the Telegraph wouldn't have put together this investigative team. So why do people get involved in dodgy stuff in football? Is it the allure of it - the fact that football fascinates millionaires* as much of the rest of us? Is it that there's no shortage of guys who, while they're very rich and very connected, aren't really the most savvy? (Why is Allardyce, comfortably a millionaire who's extremely good at his job and at the absolute pinnacle of his profession, sitting around with guys without having their company vetted and without having his representatives meet them without him first?) I reckon it must be a bit of both.
 
*Ed de Ball is a great example. He's a captain of industry, like David Hopkin, but still finds time for the working man's game. It's actually quite touching in a way, a show of noblesse oblige.


You are missing the point. Football clubs provide an excellent medium for laundering money. Not only is there cash income but there are excellent opportunities for those controlling clubs to extract money, particularly offshore if foreign players are being signed, through inflated transfer fees, agents commission, management fees etc with initial recipients providing kick backs to directors or third parties in which they have a beneficial interest. Big Sam is the tip of the iceberg. I an recall mention of "Hal's " turnstile back in the day.

Incidentally the Barclay brothers who own the Daily Telegraph and live on a monstrosity on Brecqhue are probably the U.K.' biggest tax dodging scumbags.
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#8 TRVMP

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 12:58 PM

You are missing the point. Football clubs provide an excellent medium for laundering money. Not only is there cash income but there are excellent opportunities for those controlling clubs to extract money, particularly offshore if foreign players are being signed, through inflated transfer fees, agents commission, management fees etc with initial recipients providing kick backs to directors or third parties in which they have a beneficial interest. Big Sam is the tip of the iceberg. I an recall mention of "Hal's " turnstile back in the day.

Incidentally the Barclay brothers who own the Daily Telegraph and live on a monstrosity on Brecqhue are probably the U.K.' biggest tax dodging scumbags.

 

This is actually a good post but this doesn't really apply to people investing in TPO, surely? Only a small number of those people investing in TPO will have control over a club. (The club CA Rentistas in Uruguay used to be used for this purpose but there is remarkably little info about this online in English.) Football does seem to be easily corruptible but again, transfers are massively scrutinized. It does seem to be a case of when, not if, the major deals come to light.

 

Either way just as TPO was ruled illegal* last year I eventually expect some kind of public disclosure system for transfer amounts. Already in certain countries teams that are publicly traded have to account for every cent of transfer income (Portugal is like this and I think Turkey as well. Then again, given the amount of shady agents working between Portugal and Brazil, who knows what's really going on behind the scenes?)

 

*edit: by FIFA, not a legal body


Edited by nach0king, 30 September 2016 - 12:58 PM.

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Now before Gavin goes, I'd like to ask him one more question.


Do you like Abba?


#9 TRVMP

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 03:19 PM

Southgate gets the job full-time.

 

I fancy us to beat them next time.


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Now before Gavin goes, I'd like to ask him one more question.


Do you like Abba?


#10 Bawheid

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 04:30 PM

Beat them, FUK seriously deluded­čśé
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#11 Deano1874

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 05:35 PM

Southgate gets the job full-time.

 

I fancy us to beat them next time.

 

I would fancy beating them, if we'd had punted Strachan. 


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Away in a manger, 

No crib for a bed, 

The little Lord Jesus stood up and he said, 

Brian Wake m'Lord, Brian Wake.


#12 Bawheid

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 06:37 PM

That's the thing he's now on a game to game basis next defeat one he is history . SFA still clutching at straws imo
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eat drink and be merry for tommorrow you may be radioiactive


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